Home Home
Days: 1 - 6
September 11th - 16th
- - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Euros
Conversion rate on
our visit:
€1 = $1.2715
$1 = €.7865
=================
                       
What We Had
Highs: 59°F-75°F
Lows: 50°F-52°F
Rain/Cold during walking
tour on Tues 14th
Averages:
Hi 66°F
Low 48°F
The first day of our tour was spent flying to Germany (Berlin). We arrived in Germany on day 2.
 

Where To Go Guide
(Click to Enlarge)
With all its museums and our love of history, Berlin was clearly our favorite stop on the trip. It`s easy to get around (check out Transportation), a lot of great things to see and do, good food and beer and some of the most friendly we`ve met anywhere in Europe.
 
There`s a number of pamphlets you should get to help you plan your time in Berlin. Check at your hotel, that`s where we found ours. Be sure to check and see if the information is in English.  There are two pamphlets shown in the section titled Transportation which contain the maps for the S-Bahn, U-Bahn and the Trams. There`s also one under the Museums section which describes all the best museums (82 of them) in Berlin.  Another important pamphlet (left) is one that identifies culture/cinemas/events, restaurants and sports in the area of the hotel where we stayed.  There`s a great map in the middle as well.  In fact one of the restaurants mentioned is one that we went to for a taste of Germany`s finest (it`s Germany`s oldest Beer Garden) and a number of our group stayed for dinner.
 
The map below outlines the places that we visited, where we ate and our hotel.  You can see a large version of the map by clicking on the `Berlin` link immediately under the map.  You can also get information on the individual locations by clicking on the symbol on the map.  The list above the map ties the locations together with the information and photos from our visit to each of the places.  Click on the title.  Finally, you`ll note there are also really great photos by some of our fellow travelers.  
 
Walk...Don`t Walk Signs
Ok so what`s the big deal. Nothing. It`s just sort of cool that GENERALLY the Walk, Don`t Walk lights differ from East to West. They actually tried to remove all the `commie` icons from the East but politics put a stop to it
 

East Walk Sign
Walk...Don`t Walk, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

East Don`t Walk Sign
Walk...Don`t Walk, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

West Walk Sign
Walk...Don`t Walk, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

West Don`t Walk Sign
Walk...Don`t Walk, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
 
An advertising statue outside one of many stores selling items (shirts, cups, Christmas ornaments, pens, etc) throughout Berlin. 
 

They`ve become an icon
Walk...Don`t Walk, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Gift Shop
(Post Card)
Walk...Don`t Walk, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Click on a city name above or
use the drop down list below
to jump to another city.
•  Museums
•  Stumbling Blocks (Stolpersteine)
•  Telephone cards (Heads Up)
•  Transportation
•  Walk...Don`t Walk Signs

•  Air Minstry (Finance Minstry)
•  Boat Tour
•  Book Burning
•  Brandenburg Gate
•  Check Point Charlie
•  Chris` Pics
•  East Side Gallery
•  Egyptian Museum
•  Fassbender & Rausch Chocolatiors at the Gendarmenmarkt
•  Fuhrer Bunker...`Shelter for the Leader`
•  Gendarmenmarkt
•  German History Museum
•  Jack`s Pics
•  Jewish Museum Berlin
•  Jewish Quarter
•  Kauthaus des Westen and Wittenbergplatz S-Bahn Station Memorial
•  Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe
•  Pergamon Museum
•  Reichstag Building, Germany`s Parliment Building
•  Topography of Terror
•  TV Tower

•  Gorki Park Restaurant
•  Napoljonska
•  Oderquelle Gaststatte (Restaurant)
•  Prater-Garten and Gaststatte
•  Restauration 1900 Restaurant
•  Weihenstephaner Restaurant

•  Hotel Kastanienhof

Transportation
The transportation system in Berlin is OUTSTANDING.  With one pass (see below) you can ride any of the trams, buses, trains and/or subways throughout Berlin.  In our case, there was a tram that ran in front of our hotel. 
 
Here`s a great hint.  The two tickets below both cover a single day.  The ticket on the left is for a group of up to five.  The one on the right covers one person.  Clearly, a group of 4 or five makes out well to buy the group ticket.  BTW, the ticket was available at our hotel.
 

Transportation Tickets for a group and an individual
(Click to Enlarge)
 
There are two pamphlets you`re going to want to get hold of.  They were both available at our hotel.
 
The first pamphlet is for the TRAM system.  The first picture is what the cover looks like.  The second is a picture of the map that`s inside (you really won`t be able to see much in the picture so I`ve also attached a PDF version CLICK HERE).

Tram Map
(Click to Enlarge)

Tram Map
(Click to Enlarge)
The second pamphlet is for the U and S Bahn systems. U-Bahn stands for Untergrundbahn (underground railway) and S-Bahn stands for Schnellbahn (Fast Railway).  The S-Bahn is the above-ground trains.  Here`s a good hint that Nygil gave us.  If you`re not in a hurry, use the S-Bahn.  You`ll probably get where you`re going just as fast AND you`ll get to see parts of Berlin that you`d otherwise miss. The second is a picture of the map of the U & S Bahns inside (you really won`t be able to see much in the picture so I`ve also attached a PDF version Click Here).

S and U Bahn Map
(Click to Enlarge)

U + S Bahn Map
(Click to Enlarge)
   
Museums

Museum Catalog
(Click to Enlarge)

Museum Catalog Example
(Click to Enlarge)
Museums in Berlin are OUTSTANDING.  The catalog on the left includes a short description, address, phone numbers, a map and S-Bahn, U-Bahn and/or tram stop for more that 80 museums.  In addition, there is an indication of whether a particular museum was included in our 3 day Museum Pass (pictured below).  The pass gave us unlimited access to 60 Berlin museums over a three day period.  As you can see the pass cost 19 Euros, although it was included in our tour.  It`s a really great deal!  A strong recommendation, even if you have to pay for it yourself.

Museum Pass (both sides)
(Click to Enlarge)
      
Telephone cards (Heads Up)
In the past we have recommended the use of Telephone Cards.  They can be purchased at Wal-Mart, Sam`s, Krogers, etc.  They are convenient, were usable at our hotel and can even be 'refilled' while you travel (there`s a phone number listed on the card which you use in conjuction with a credit card to add minutes).  
 
However, this time our card didn't work out very well.  It`s always been true that you pay a `minutes premium` when using the card in foreign countries.  In the past this has been 2 or 3 minutes.  That is, for each minute you`re on a call, your card is charged 2 or 3 minutes.  Thus a 120 minute card would get you 60 or 40 minutes of long distance calling from Europe.  Not a bad deal if you consider what you`d pay if you used a credit card.  That was the way it worked IN THE PAST.  This year the premium was 14 minutes per minute.  This means my 120 minute card gave me 8.5 minutes of long distance to the U.S..  Ouch!  I'm not sure I'd recommend using telephone cards at that rate.  Be sure to contact the issuer and find out what the premium. 
 
One more point.  In Berlin we saw a number of places where you could call the U.S. for as little as $.10 per minute.  I used one of these and it worked very well.  However, make sure you ask about the connect charge BEFORE you make a call.  While the service I used was $.10 per minute, there was an $.80 per call connect charge.  Now I spoke to my son for over ten minute for around $2 (still pretty cheap), it wasn't $.10 per minute.
Stumbling Blocks (Stolpersteine)
From Wikipedia: Stolperstein is the German word for "stumbling block", "obstacle", or "something in the way". The artist Gunter Demnig has given this word a new meaning, that of a small, cobblestone-sized memorial for a single victim of Nazism. These memorials commemorate those deported and killed by the Nazis, mostly in Nazi concentration camps or extermination camps, including Jews, Sinti and Romani people (also called gypsies), members of the Resistance during World War II, homosexuals, Jehovah's Witnesses, Christians in opposition to the Nazis and the disabled. The list of cities that have stolpersteine now extends to several countries and hundreds of cities and towns.
 
We saw stumbling blocks all over Berlin.  An amazing memorial when you realize the people, whose name appears on the blocks, once stood where you're standing.


Stumbling Stones
(Click to Enlarge)
 

Stumbling Stones
(Click to Enlarge)
 
German History Museum
The German History Museum is an outstanding visit.  The Museum covers the history of Germany from 100BC to 1994.  We took a lot of pictures so be sure to check out the extra pictures.
          
You'll get the pamphlet (which includes the floor plan) when you go to the museum.  We were only able to see the 1933-1945 portion of the museum.  We spent almost two hours on just that part. It was worth every minute.

History Museum Pamphlet
German History Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Floor plan
German History Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
The exhibits were very well done.  We also had the audio guide which gave a very detailed description of each item.  Well worth the extra money...but be prepared to listen to a lot o detail

Linda looking over propaganda signs
German History Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Linda checking out the uniform display
German History Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
The two pictures below are very interesting for what they don`t contain.  In the original photo there were a number of watches on the left arm of the man pushing up the flag.  When the photo was published, the watches were gone.  A fine example of the post WWII propaganda.

Man with watches (left hand of the flag man)
German History Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Close up of the `Flag Man`
German History Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
The picture below is an Asparagus Tong which was buried, in the spring of 1945, by 16 year old Alexander Graf von Lynar-Redern before leaving the East.  After settling the issue of property rights, Lunar-Redern used the map he had drawn in 1945 to locate and dig up the boxes in the summer of 1995.  Fascinating!  

Asparagus tongs buried before escaping to the West (see the
story)
German History Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
German History Museum
(Click to Enlarge)
Deutsches Historisches Museum
Unter den Linden 2
10117 Berlin
Tel: +49 - (0)30 - 20304 - 0
FAX: +49 - (0)30 - 20304 - 543
      
East Side Gallery
The day we arrived we decided the Wall was a place we couldn't miss. The East Side Gallery (named because all the art work you see below is on the east side of the wall) is the longest section of the wall that remains. It is now a gallery of art from the moving to the strange.
 
Be sure to checkout the video at the bottom of this section.  Paul took the video from inside our bus as we left Berlin for Dresden.  Note the sound track.  It`s John F. Kennedy in Berlin.  Another great choice by Nygil.
 

Looking down the full length of the Wall
East Side Gallery, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

A Tribute to America
East Side Gallery, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Look Closely!
East Side Gallery, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Yup!! Underwear...
East Side Gallery, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Leonid Brezhnev and Erich Honecker
East Side Gallery, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Berlin Wall on the way out of town
East Side Gallery, Berlin

Video by: Paul Ehrlich
(Video - Click to Play)
Berliner Mauer = Berlin Wall
East Side Gallery, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Mahlenstrabe 70-71
10243 Berlin-Friedrichshain, Germany
      
Check Point Charlie
Check Point Charlie as it appears today is NOTHING like what it was like in actual operation.  There are even `American soldier' available for pictures.  Not soldiers.  Not Americans.
 
We didn't actually visit the Check Point Charlie Museum.  It isn't recommended although there are (apparently) lots of things to look at in a VERY small building.

Check Point Today (notice McDonalds in the background)
Check Point Charlie, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Near Charlie looking into East Berlin
Check Point Charlie, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Us in front of Charlie
Check Point Charlie, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Look closely at the picture below.  You can clearly see that Check Point Charlie looked completely different then it does today.

Charlie as it actually looked
Check Point Charlie, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

At least this sign is authentic
Check Point Charlie, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

The next two pictures show the path of the Wall.  Berliner Mauer is German for Berlin Wall.

Linda standing next to where the wall used to stand
Check Point Charlie, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Plaque identifying the path of the Wall
Check Point Charlie, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Checkpoint Charlie when it was active
(Post Card)
Check Point Charlie, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Check Point Charlie
Junction of Friedrichstrae with Zimmerstrae and Mauerstra
   
Kauthaus des Westen and Wittenbergplatz S-Bahn Station Memorial
The Kauthaus des Westen department store (often called KaDeWe) is the often referred to as the Harrod`s of Germany. We don`t do a lot of shopping on our trips, but it`s fun to see a store like this. It truly is one of those `if they don`t have it...you don`t need it'.
 
The first picture is of an artistic display near the entrance to the store.

An interesting display near the entrance
KaDeWe @ Wittenbergplatz, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
 
The next two pictures are examples of display cases.

Display case
KaDeWe @ Wittenbergplatz, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Another display
KaDeWe @ Wittenbergplatz, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
 
The next picture was particularly interesting.  Obviously there`s a market for American products.

One final display...look closely
KaDeWe @ Wittenbergplatz, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
 
The next two pictures are of a memorial located just outside the S-Bahn station at Wittenbergplatz (the location of the KaDeWe store).  The memorial is a list of death camps run by the Nazis in the 30`s and 40`s.  The title of the memorial reads: Sites of Horror...which we can never forget.  Germany is intent on not forgiving or forgetting.  The camps listed are locations where people were sent from this station.

Horrors Memorial Reminder
KaDeWe @ Wittenbergplatz, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

The full memorial
KaDeWe @ Wittenbergplatz, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Kauthaus des Westen (KaDeWe)
Tauentzienstr. 21-24
10789 Berlin
Tel: 49 (0)30 2121 0
FAX: 49 (0)30 2121 1156
      
Gendarmenmarkt
Gendarmenmarkt is said to be one of the most beautiful squares in Europe. It was created at the end of the 17th century as a market place, the Linden Markt. Frankly, not a place that I'd worry about seeing. It is, however, a great example of how an area can be rebuilt after extensive damage during WWII.
 

Franzsische Dom (French Cathedral)
Gendarmenmarkt, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Konzerthaus (Concert Hall)
Gendarmenmarkt, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Deutsche Dom (German Cathedral)
Gendarmenmarkt, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
   
Chris` Pics

TV tower view
Chris` Pics, Berlin
Picture by: Chris Lee
(Click to Enlarge)

Boat cruise - hey check that out
Chris` Pics, Berlin
Picture by: Chris Lee
(Click to Enlarge)

Berlin views
Chris` Pics, Berlin
Picture by: Chris Lee
(Click to Enlarge)

TV tower with cathedral
Chris` Pics, Berlin
Picture by: Chris Lee
(Click to Enlarge)

Pondering gals
Chris` Pics, Berlin
Picture by: Chris Lee
(Click to Enlarge)

Pigeon eyeing a big payday
Chris` Pics, Berlin
Picture by: Chris Lee
(Click to Enlarge)
Jack`s Pics
Jack filled in some missing pictures at the Brandenberg Gate.
 

American Embassy at Brandenberg Gate
Jack`s Pics, Berlin
Picture by: Jack Donner
(Click to Enlarge)

Odd couples at Brandenberg Gate
Jack`s Pics, Berlin
Picture by: Jack Donner
(Click to Enlarge)
Brandenburg Gate
Sort of a dreary day. Too bad we didn't stay long.
 
From Wikipedia: The Gate is located west of the city center at the junction of Unter den Linden and Ebertstrasse, immediately west of the Pariser Platz. It is the only remaining gate of a series through which Berlin was once entered. One block to the north stands the Reichstag building. The gate is the monumental entry to Unter den Linden, the renowned boulevard of linden trees which formerly led directly to the city palace of the Prussian monarchs.
 
A couple of things to note. First, the American embassy is located right next to the Gate (you can see the top edge in the first picture below). A full picture of the embassy is included in Jack`s Brandenberg pictures. Second the hotel shown is the one where Michael Jackson suspended his newly acquired baby over the rail.
 

Approaching the Gate from the West
Brandenburg Gate, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

From the West (Note the American Embassy on the right)
Brandenburg Gate, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Linda pointing out some war damage
Brandenburg Gate, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Hotel Adlon (back, right, green roof) where Michael Jackson
suspended his baby
Brandenburg Gate, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Looking back (West) at the Gate
Brandenburg Gate, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Our group almost to the Gate
Brandenburg Gate, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Brandenberg Gate 1961-1989
(Post Card)
Brandenburg Gate, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Brandenburg Gate
Junction of Unter den Linden and Ebertstrae
Immediately west of the Pariser Platz
Berlin
   
Fuhrer Bunker...`Shelter for the Leader`
The Fhrerbunker (German, literally meaning "shelter for the leader" or "the Fhrer's shelter") was located beneath Hitler's New Reich Chancellery in Berlin, Germany.
 
The place our group is standing (in the first picture below) was (during the reign of the Nazis) outside the back of the Reich Chancellery and directly on top of the Fuhrer`s bunker. The bunker is actually still there but imploded by the Russians and (later) the East Germans. 

Note: Germany did not acknowledge the location until as late as 2007. That`s when the sign (below) was erected. There`s a lot of good information about the bunker on Wikipedia (press the Web Site button below).

Finally, there's a really good depiction where the Reich Chancellery stood and the location of the Bunker on Wikimapia (click here to jump to Wikimapia).   As you move your pointer around the locations/identification of the older buildings are displayed.  The place where we are standing in the pictures below were taken just north of the larger section of the Chancellery and immediately over the top of bunker (the tiny square outlined).


Our group getting the facts
Fuhrerbunker, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Where it was...not much to see
Fuhrerbunker, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

More...not much to see
Fuhrerbunker, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Fuhrerbunker Facts
Fuhrerbunker, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
   
Reichstag Building, Germany`s Parliment Building
The Reichstag Building houses the German Reichstag (Parliment). The only part of the building open to the public is the Dome. We arrived early but still had to wait about an hour. The Dome is actually a light source fo the Plenary Chamber below.  Unfortunately, the weather wasn`t very good during our visit.

Front of the Building
Reichstag Building, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Bottom of the reflector...looking down into the plenary
chamber
Reichstag Building, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Top of the reflector
Reichstag Building, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Memorial to the 96 Reichstag members of the opposition
parties killed by the Nazis
Reichstag Building, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Memorial to the 96 Reichstag members of the opposition
parties killed by the Nazis
Reichstag Building, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Brandenburg Gate (through the rain covered dome)
Reichstag Building, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Reichstag after it burned
(Post Card)
Reichstag Building, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Reichstag Building
Platz der Republik 1
10557 Berlin, Germany
Tel: +49 30/2270
      
Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe
From Wikipedia: The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe (German: Denkmal fr die ermordeten Juden Europas), also known as the Holocaust Memorial (German: Holocaust-Mahnmal)... It consists of...2,711 concrete slabs or "stelae", one for each page of the Talmud arranged in a grid pattern on a sloping field. The stelae are 2.38m (7.8') long, 0.95m (3' 1.5") wide and vary in height from 0.2 m to 4.8m (8" to 15'9").
 

Inside the memorial
Jewish Memorial, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Inside the memorial
Jewish Memorial, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Inside the memorial
Jewish Memorial, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Inside the memorial
Jewish Memorial, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe
   
Jewish Museum Berlin
From Wikipedia: The Jewish Museum Berlin (Jdisches Museum Berlin), covers two millennia of German history. It consists of two buildings. One is the old Kollegienhaus, a former courthouse, built in the 18th century. The other is a new addition specifically built for the museum. This was one of the first buildings in Berlin designed after German reunification. The museum opened to the public in 2001.
 
When you arrive at the museum you`ll be given a Museum Floor Plan.  To preview the plan (or print yourself a copy) click here.
 
Notice the police officer in front of the building.  Germany is making it clear that there will be no incidents at building that are part of the Jewish community.  We saw the same protection at several locations.

Watching a video presentation
Jewish Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Display Mural
Jewish Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Admission Ticket
Jewish Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Video display
Jewish Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Main building
Jewish Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Jewish Museum Berlin
Lindenstrae 9-14
10969 Berlin
Tel: +49 (0)30 259 93 300
FAX: +49 (0)30 259 93 409
      
Fassbender & Rausch Chocolatiors at the Gendarmenmarkt
If you're into chocolate...I mean REALLY into chocolate...this is what heaven will be like.  The displays pictured below are all chocolate.  The vulcano may not look like much, but it took me seven shots to get a picture with 'lava' spouting.  This is a must see and the chocolate is a must buy! 

A chocolate Brandenburg Gate
Fassbender & Rausch, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Titanic in chocolate
Fassbender & Rausch, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Linda and a chocolate Reichstag Building
Fassbender & Rausch, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Linda and a chocolate Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedachtnis-Kirche
Fassbender & Rausch, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Chocolate Vulcano (Look close for the lava at the top)
Fassbender & Rausch, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
From across the street
Fassbender & Rausch, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Fassbender & Rausch
Charlottenstrae 60
10117 Berlin
Tel: +49 (0)30 - 20 45 84 43
FAX: +49 (0)30 - 20-45-84-45
      
Air Minstry (Finance Minstry)
Now the Finance Minstry, this is one of the few buildings built by the Nazis that remains in Berlin today. It was originally built by Herman Goring to house the Luftwaffe. The picture we are looking at was painted durng the East German Communists. It`s stiil there today because it`s a great representation of the foundation of the communist doctrine.

Jakob explaining the `Peoples` (East German) art work
Air Ministry, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Nygil rooting for the Longhorns?
Air Ministry, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Jakob filling us on the Air Ministry
Air Ministry, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
A long look down the building
Air Ministry, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Air Minstry (Finance Minstry)
Wilhelmstrasse 97
10117 Berlin
   
Topography of Terror
The exhibit has been in place since 1997 with the latest update opening in 2010. The exhibit runs along two basement walls from the headquarters of the Gestapo and the headquarters for the SS (in what was the Hotel Prinz Albrecht) during the second world war.

The new Documentation Center was officially opened in May 2010 by Federal President Horst Khler on the occasion of the 65th anniversary of the end of World War II. 

Finally, there is a segment of the Berlin Wall preserved as an adjunct to the Nazi history. Definately worth a visit.  Almost forgot...it`s free.


Individual alcove
Topography of Terror, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Looking out from the Basement of the Prinz Albrecht Hotel
Topography of Terror, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Jan and LInda looking over the display
Topography of Terror, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Explaining the basement wall
Topography of Terror, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Looking down the entire exhibit
Topography of Terror, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Topography of Terror
Niederkirchnerstrae 8
10963 Berlin, Germany
Tel: 030 25450950
      
Book Burning
From the Wikipedia: There were a number of Nazi book burnings in 1933. It all started when the Main Office for Press and Propaganda of the German Student Association (Deutsche Studentenschaft) proclaimed a nationwide `Action against the Un-German Spirit`, which was to climax in a literary purge or `cleansing` (`Sauberung`) by fire. 
 
 May the 10th was set as the date when university students were to march in torchlight parades `against the un-German spirit.' In Berlin, some 40,000 people gathered in the Opernplatz to hear Joseph Goebbels deliver a fiery address: `No to decadence and moral corruption!` Goebbels enjoined the crowd. `Yes to decency and morality in family and state! I consign to the flames the writings of Heinrich Mann, Ernst Gloser, Erich Kostner.` 
 
The memorial is below ground (see the picture on the right below).  It`s bookshelves.  Click here to see the bookshelves at night.  Intriguing. 
 

Burning Site (where the group is standing)
Book Burning, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)


 

Memorial (Bookshelves underground)
Book Burning, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Bebelplatz from across the street
Book Burning, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Book Burning
Bebelplatz
Berlin
   
Boat Tour
Our final night, wee took a boat tour of Berlin.  The tour took us by the Nikolai Quarter, Museum Island, Friedrichstrabe, Government Quarter, Reichstag (seat of the German Government), Berlin Main Station, German Chancellery, House of World Cultures and back to the shipping pier.
 

Loading up
Boat Tour, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Settling In
Boat Tour, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Riverside view
Boat Tour, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Museum Island
Boat Tour, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Our Boat
Boat Tour, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
 
Brochure
Boat Tour, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Boat Tour
Wendenschloss Strasse 350-354
12557 Berlin
Tel: 030 - 651 34 15
FAX: 030 - 651 94 22
         
Egyptian Museum
A great display of Egyptian artifacts. A good collection but similar to most others. The big difference is the statue of Nefertiti. It's a one of a kind in the world. It makes a good exhibit...Great! 
 
 
The baboon of Thoth (also called Isdes)
Egyptian Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)



Statue of Senenmut
Egyptian Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
 
 

Roman trim
Egyptian Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)



Roman Statues
Egyptian Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Bust of Nefertiti
(Post Card)
Egyptian Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Egyptian Museum
Museum Island
Bodestrasse 1-3
10178 Berlin, Germany
Tel: 20 90 5577
      
Pergamon Museum
The Pergamon is an ABSOLUTE MUST SEE. The presentation of the Pergamon Altar, the Ishtar Gate and the Market Gate of Miletus is magnificent. It`s like describing the Grand Canyon. You have to see to believe it.
 

Approaching along the river
Pergamon Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Pergamon Altar
Pergamon Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Pergamon Altar
Pergamon Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Pergamon Altar
Pergamon Museum, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)

Greek Architecture
Pergamon Museum, Berlin
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Market Gate of Miletus
Pergamon Museum, Berlin
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Ishtar Gate, Babylon, 6th Century BC
Pergamon Museum, Berlin
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Column Hall of the Trajanstempel
Pergamon Museum, Berlin
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Front Entrance
Pergamon Museum, Berlin
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Pergamon Museum
Bodestrasse 1-3
D-10178 Berlin
Tel: 030 - 266 42 42 42
FAX: 030 - 266 42 22 90
      
Jewish Quarter
Our final walking tour in Berlin was in the Jewish quarter. This is the area of Berlin where the Jews original settled because it was unwanted by others. Before WWII there were 150,000 Jews in Berlin. After the war...less than 5,000. 

 When the Nazis took control, they instituted a policy of Aryanization. They forced Jews to sell everything for as little as 5% of its value. The recover of property is still taking place. Vacant lots may represent property that is still in dispute. No one will build for fear that it may be owned by someone yet to make a claim. 

 The temple shown below is the largest Jewish Temple in Berlin. Heavily damaged during WWII it has been restored to original splendor.


Department store Aryanized by the Nazis
Jewish Quarter, Berlin
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Wiating to go intoday the Jewish Graveyard
Jewish Quarter, Berlin
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Close-Up to the Memorial to the Jewish Dead
Jewish Quarter, Berlin
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In the Graveyard
Jewish Quarter, Berlin
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Info on one of the only markers in the yard
Jewish Quarter, Berlin
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Jewish Synagogue
Jewish Quarter, Berlin
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Jewish Quarter
TV Tower
From Wikipedia: The Fernsehturm (German for "television tower") is a television tower in the city centre of Berlin, Germany. Close to Alexanderplatz and part of the World Federation of Great Towers (WFGT), the tower was constructed between 1965 and 1969 by the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) administration who intended it as a symbol of Berlin, which it remains today,[1] as it is easily visible throughout the central and some suburban districts of Berlin. With its height of 368 meters, it is the tallest structure in Germany. 

Needless to say we saw the tower everywhere.  It started as a way for the East Germans to show off the might of the communists.  Now it`s a way of finding directions from most locations in downtown Berlin.


Skyline along the river with the TV Tower behind
(Post Card)
TV Tower, Berlin
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Near the Hackescher Markt
TV Tower, Berlin
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Near the Neues Museum
TV Tower, Berlin
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Behind the Berlin Cathedral
TV Tower, Berlin
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Napoljonska
We had all just arrived in Berlin and needed a snack and some COFFEE to get us through to dinner. Nice little shop, good food and it`s immediately across from our hotel.

Jan, Jack and Linda just arrived in Berlin
Napoljonska Restaurant, Berlin
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A VERY old water pump in front of the restaurant
Napoljonska Restaurant, Berlin
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In the evening
Napoljonska Restaurant, Berlin
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Kastanienallee 43
10119 Berlin, Germany
Tel: 030 40301944
   
Weihenstephaner Restaurant
A good meal, located next to the Hackeschen Markt S-Buhn station and the tram which runs by our hotel run by as well.

The menu - our first exposure a menu in German (they also
had and english version)
Weihenstephaner Restaurant, Berlin
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Nope I`m not the waiter
Weihenstephaner Restaurant, Berlin
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Our first dinner at Hackeschen Markt
Weihenstephaner Restaurant, Berlin
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Weihenstephaner Restaurant
Neue Promenade 5
10178 Berlin (Mitte)
Tel: +49 (0)30 25 76 28 71
FAX: +49 (0)30 25 76 28 69
         
Restauration 1900 Restaurant
After meeting our group for the first time, we headed out for dinner.  Great place for a group meal. 

Our first dinner together
Restauration 1900 Restaurant, Berlin
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Our first dinner together (sorry for the blurriness)
Restauration 1900 Restaurant, Berlin
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Our first dinner together
Restauration 1900 Restaurant, Berlin
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Our first dinner together
Restauration 1900 Restaurant, Berlin
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Our first dinner together
Restauration 1900 Restaurant, Berlin
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Arriving for dinner
Restauration 1900 Restaurant, Berlin
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Restauration 1900
Housemannstrasse 1
10435 Berlin, Germany
Tel: 030 4422494
      
Prater-Garten and Gaststatte
Oldest beer garden in Berlin. From their website:
Once upon a time
Beginnings often remain vague. A certain Porath is said to have started serving beer at Kastanienallee 7 in 1837. But documents show that the Kalbo family purchased the establishment in 1852 and started developing it. This is when it evolved from a beer garden and outdoor caf into a place of all-round enjoyment and leisure.
We met at the Prater-Garten to sample some great German Beer.  Nygil was a great help as our interpreter...helpiung us with the choices and passing them back our to the waitress.  We could have decided on our own, but it`s a LOT easy with someone who speaks German.
 
Most of the group stayed for dinner.  We (Jan, jack, Linda & Ron) moved onto Oderquelle Restaurant.

Nygil as our translator
Prater-Garten & Gaststatte, Berlin
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Beer and diner
Prater-Garten & Gaststatte, Berlin
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Figuring out what to order
Prater-Garten & Gaststatte, Berlin
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Out Front
Prater-Garten & Gaststatte, Berlin
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Prater-Garten and Gaststatte
Kastanienallee 7-9
10435 Berlin
Tel: 4485688
   
Oderquelle Gaststatte (Restaurant)
Nygil`s recommendation...and a good one. Great German food at a decent price.
After Dinner
Oderquelle Gaststatte, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Oderquelle Gaststatte (Restaurant)
Oberberger Strasse 27
10435 Berlin
Tel: 030 44 00 80 80
   
Gorki Park Restaurant
It`s labeled as a Russian Cafe. I had Beef Strogenoff (which I guess is Russian) and it was delicious! In fact, all the food we had was good. It`s no more than 20 steps from the Rosenthaler Platz U-Bahn station. A definite recommendation. 

 
Gorki Park Restaurant
(Click to Enlarge)
Gorki Park Restaurant
Weinbergsweg 25
10119 Berlin
Tel: 030 4487286
   
Hotel Kastanienhof

Hotel Pension Kastanienhof, Berlin
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Our first nights stay. We made a reservation for an additional night (the night prior to the start of our tour) via email. Not a big deal, just contact them for the rate and send them your credit card number. A little scary since the credit card number is sent "in the open", but it has NOT been a problem.
 
Great location.  A tram runs right in front of the hotel with a stop 100 feet to the south.  Head south on the other side of the street (the direction you head to get to the subway).  The tram stop when you're returning to the hotel from the subway is in front of the hotdog stand immediately south of the hotel.
 
Great little coffee/sweets shop right across the street.
 
No Internet service.  CHEAP (1 hour = 1,25 Euros) WIFI is available at a hotdog stand two LONG blocks to the south (NOT the hotdog stand by the tram stop).
Hotel Pension Kastanienhof, Berlin
(Click to Enlarge)
Kastanienallee 65
10119 Berlin
Tel: +49(0)30-44305-0
FAX: +49(0)30-44305-111